The Youth Mentoring Network

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Registrations now open for special one day national youth mentoring conference

Tuesday 14 June, 2016 - Ellerslie Event Centre, Auckland 

Quality | Connections | Impact – lifting the effectiveness of Youth Mentoring in NZ 

Dynamic speakers with illuminating cultural perspectives.

Strong voice of young people throughout the action-packed day.

FREE copy of the comprehensive 2nd edition of the Guide to Effective and Safe Practice in Youth Mentoring Aotearoa New Zealand.

Who should attend?

The conference brings together a wide range of people who work with young people - youth workers, educators, mentors, mentor programme providers, government agencies and community workers - to learn about and debate important national issues in the youth development / youth mentoring sector. 

Conference programme 

Our programme features a number of renowned keynote speakers, interspersed with breakout sessions and panel discussions.

The 2nd Edition of the Guide to Effective and Safe Practice in Youth Mentoring Aotearoa New Zealand, published in May, will be a key focus of the morning sessions, commencing with our opening joint keynote presenters - Nathan Mikaere-Wallis (Director of X-Factor Education, facilitating the application of neuroscience to youth practice) and Hana O’Regan (General Manager of Oranga/Wellbeing for Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu). This will be followed by two breakout sessions which will explore specific aspects of the new Guide in interesting detail.

After lunch, Murray Edridge, Deputy Chief Executive, Ministry of Social Development Community Investment, will present on the new government community investment approach and what this means to the youth development sector. This will be followed by a facilitated panel discussion which will explore important local issues in the Youth Development / Mentoring sector.  To conclude the day we have two dynamic and inspirational closing addresses. Further details on our closing speakers will follow shortly. 

view conference programme

Registration fee

The standard conference fee is $195 inclusive GST

A special group discount of $175 inclusive GST for each additional person from the same organisation is also available.

Conference details:

Tuesday 14 June 2016

Ellerslie Event Centre, Auckland

We invite you to join us for this special one-day conference.

Register online now


Wellington MentorPlus course, 4 & 5 July 2016 - registrations now open!

Registrations are now open for our next MentorPlus course to be held in Wellington in July. T The details are:

Wellington

Date: 4 & 5 July 2016

Location:  Ara Taiohi Offices, Cuba Street, Wellington 


Innovative youth mentoring programme at the University of Auckland

More vulnerable youth will be mentored under an innovative youth mentoring programme at the University of Auckland, thanks to a $220,000 grant from the Vodafone NZ Foundation.

Dr Pat Bullen and Dr Kelsey Deane, who both specialise in youth development and youth mentoring at the University’s Faculty of Education and Social Work, will lead the project.


Michael-karcherListen to Professor Michael J. Karcher’s Auckland presentation

We were delighted to host Professor Karcher, Unversity of Texus, leading United States mentoring researcher and co-editor of both editions of the Handbook of Youth Mentoring, last month for a presentation in Auckland. 

We were completely humbled by Professor Karcher’s commitment to offer the best possible support during his brief visit to NZ – to the extent that he decided to revise his planned address and undertake significant research into NZ circumstances

We took the opportunity to record Professor Karchers address and have included the link to the recording.  It is just over an hour long and finishes just before a video clip he used from the Kung Fu Panda movie which depicts the need as a mentor to ‘trust the process - it is not about trying to fix the young person’.

In his presentation, Professor Karcher really explored the continuum of developmental relationships between adults and young people to help define mentoring and describe how it works.  He spoke at length about the concept of VIPs – ‘very important people’ in young people’s lives and referred to an excellent quote by Richard Lerner (Director of the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University) “Our calling someone a mentor does not make them one. No one is a mentor until the mentee sees them as one”.


Guide to Effective Practice in Youth Mentoring New Zealand, Edition 2 - Update

In our June e-newsletter we announced that we were about to get underway with a major refresh of our Guide to Effective Practice in Youth Mentoring NZ and invited people to be part of an advisory group to review and provide feedback on the publication as it develops.

We are delighted with the response we have received and are pleased to advise we have an excellent cross section of representatives from mentoring providers, government agencies involved in mentoring, academic researchers and NZYMN trustees participating in the advisory group.


Listen to Prof. Toni Zimmerman's presentation on mentoring at risk youth

It was really good to see so many of you at Distinguished visitor Professor Toni Zimmerman's presentations in Wellington and Auckland last month.  The NZYMN welcomed the opportunity to co-host these presentations with the University of Auckland, Faculty of Education.  Thank you to Dr. Pat Bullen and the University of Auckland for sponsoring the Professor's visit. 

For those of you who were unable to attend in person we are pleased to be able to offer you the opportunity to listen to the Professor's Auckland presentation. 

Read more

Listen to Prof. Toni Zimmerman's presentation on mentoring at risk youth

It was really good to see so many of you at Distinguished visitor Professor Toni Zimmerman's presentations in Wellington and Auckland last month.  The NZYMN welcomed the opportunity to co-host these presentations with the University of Auckland, Faculty of Education.  Thank you to Dr. Pat Bullen and the University of Auckland for sponsoring the Professor's visit. 

For those of you who were unable to attend in person we are pleased to be able to offer you the opportunity to listen to the Professor's Auckland presentation. 

The link to the Audio is at the bottom of webpage opens here.

The presentation is approximately one hour in duration and concludes just before the end of the Q&A session.  Prof. Zimmerman is a very accomplished and engaging public speaker and does not use many slides during her presentation. You may therefore find it valuable to scroll through the excellent introductory power point presentation from the home page of the Colorado State University Campus Corps webpage while listening to her speak

The main focus of the Professor’s presentation is the Campus Corps youth mentoring model she and her colleagues developed in response to an identified community need to better serve at-risk youth.  The young people being referred to Campus Corps from Youth Justice, Social Services agencies and schools are presenting with some of the most challenging behavioural and mental health issues.  The mentoring model has a unique three-pronged approach to address their specific needs: 

  • One-on-one mentoring
  • Mentoring pairs also engage in group-based activities, and
  • Family Therapists are onsite to support youth as needed.

The programme has been running for about six years now and is achieving some very promising outcomes. Research results show that among the youth that attend Campus Corps, thereis  improvement in the following areas:  

  • Reduced truancy
  • Reduced substance use
  • Reduced delinquent behavior
  • Improved attitudes about substance use, and
  • Improved psychological well being.

Participation in the programme for the mentors is also showing some very positive results and is associated with 63% lower odds of dropping out of university in any given year.  Student mentors reported:

  • Improved leadership skills
  • Improved ability to manage stress
  • Increased self-awareness
  • Expanded commitment to civic action, and
  • Enriched interpersonal skills

Professor Zimmerman’s experiences certainly highlight important strategies for working effectively with vulnerable youth. More specifically how to: sustain matches; engage in safe group-based activities; support youth autonomy; and provide therapy in the moment. The Campus Corps model  also highlights the benefits of youth mentoring as a service learning activity. Since Professor Zimmerman’s visit there has been significant interest in the Campus Corps model. A team of academics and government officials are currently exploring how this model could be adapted and implemented here in Aotearoa. The NZYMN is delighted with the interest generated from Professor Zimmerman’s presentations and will continue to keep you informed of any progress.



Why Kevin Spacey thinks we should "send the elevator back down"

An inspiring article by Jean Rhodes, Chronicle of Evidence-based Mentoring

If you have reached a comfortable level yourself, you have the moral obligation to “send the elevator back down.” This phrase, spoken by Spacey's mentor, has served as his constant reminder to provide young people with the same sorts of opportunities and role modeling that he had.

Read the full article here.


Invitation to register your programme with the Youth Mentoring Network

Do you offer mentoring services to young people in your community? Do you need to recruit more mentors? If your answer to either question is YES, we encourage you to register your programme with the Youth Mentoring Network.

We receive numerous enquiries from people wanting to volunteer to mentor a young person. We also receive many requests from parents and caregivers, social workers and school counsellors asking for help to find mentors for young people under their care.


Two recent articles from The Chronicle of Evidence Based Mentoring

Chronicle of Evidence based mentoring_opt (1)

  • Strategies that formal mentoring programs can use to facilitate natural mentoring relationships.  article
  • How to use the power of mentoring to support students academically article

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Fatima Leung-Wai from Roots Collective talks with Cris Smith from West Lynn. Photo / Dean Purcell

Mentors make a difference

Volunteers make a difference to communities throughout New Zealand, one young person at a time, finds Dionne Christian (NZ Herald, Saturday 15 March 2014)

On any given weekends, all across New Zealand, there are people who are volunteering their time to guide and advise young people. These volunteer mentors belong to a raft of programmes (some home-grown; some international) which aim to make a difference in the lives of individuals and communities.

Programmes may involve one-to-one mentoring or be in a group or community.

Read more here.


         powerup mentoring
Tyler McCarthy (centre at back), with Quinton, 9, (centre left) Mercedez, 7, mum Lemalu and dad Sa. Photo / Sarah Ivey

Mentoring initiative success

NZ Herald:  Wednesday 19 March 2014

By Vaimoana Tapaleao

Tyler McCarthy knows that in order to get to where he wants to be one day, he has to work hard now.

So when a mentoring programme started up at his church last year, he knew he had to get involved.

The 16-year-old, a year 12 student at Kelston Boys High, enrolled at the Pasifika Power Up station at the Congregational Christian Church of Samoa, in Te Atatu.

"It was good because it helped me to really focus. At home, it can be hard because my little brother and sister are always coming into my room.

"But at Power Up, I was with other kids who were focused too and were really wanting to pass their NCEA."

Read more here.